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Criminal Law Terms

Li Law Group
 

Li Law Group is a law firm in Omaha, Nebraska. Our attorneys have successfully defended many clients with criminal charges. We are attentive to hear our clients and understand their goals. We develop and prepare our cases to achieve our clients' needs and wants. Through trust, talent, efforts, and teamwork, we zealously represent our clients. If you have need a criminal defense lawyer, call us at 402.391.2486. Our office is located at 8424 West Center Road Ste 108, Omaha, Nebraska.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Arraignment

  • A hearing to inform a defendant of the charges against them, possible penalties, and whether the defendant wishes to plead guilty or not guilty to the charges.
     

Bail

  • Sometimes used interchangeably with ‘bond’, this refers to the conditions that the court may impose on a defendant in order to be released from custody. This often involves posting money as security that the defendant will appear in court for further hearings, but may also involve other restrictions on the defendant’s liberties while the charges are pending against them.

Bond

  • Sometimes used interchangeably with ‘bail’, this refers to the conditions that the court may impose on a defendant in order to be released from custody. This often involves posting money as security that the defendant will appear in court for further hearings, but may also involve other restrictions on the defendant’s liberties while the charges are pending against them.
     

  • Posting bond is one of the most common ways to be released from custody before the conclusion of a criminal case. The court holds a certain sum of money until the case is resolved in exchange for allowing the defendant to go free in the meantime. If the defendant fails to return for their court appearance or violates some other condition of the bond, they will likely forfeit the money that was posted and an arrest warrant will be issued. Bonding out is helpful because, in addition to not having to spend extra time in jail, it can improve your chances to successfully defend against the criminal charges.
     

  • Not all defendants are given the option to post bond, and not all bonds are the same. In determining whether a bond should be available or not, and how much it should cost, the court is primarily concerned with two things: 1) how much of a danger the defendant poses to the community; and 2) how likely it is that the defendant will not honor their obligation to appear at their next court date. The amount of the required bond will vary based on the offense and the specifics of the case. More serious charges typically have higher bond requirements. Bonds may also carry other restrictions, such as not traveling beyond a certain distance or not contacting someone involved in the alleged crime.
     

  • If a bond is allowed, the court will accept the required payment and release the defendant until the next court appearance. If the charges are later dismissed or the defendant is acquitted, the bond money will typically be refunded to the defendant. The defendant also has the option of assigning the bond money so that when it is released, the money is paid out to someone other than the defendant. This can be a good way to help assure the person paying the bond that they will see their money again, or bond assignment can be used as a sort of down payment for attorney fees. Bond requirements may also be changed throughout the course of a case. If a defendant is unable to pay their required bond amount, for example, they may ask the court to reconsider the bond amount in the hope that it will be reduced to some amount that is more realistic for the defendant. On the other side of the coin, if new facts come to light that reflect poorly on the defendant, the state may ask that the bond be raised or withdrawn altogether. A skilled criminal law attorney can help maximize your chances of obtaining a favorable bond.

 

Classes of Offenses
 

  • Felony

    • The most serious category of crimes that typically carry a possible punishment of imprisonment for a period of one year or more.

  • Misdemeanor

    • Crimes that are less serious than ‘felonies’ which typically carry a possible punishment of imprisonment for less than one year and a $1,000 fine.